The World Health Organization on Breast milk Milk donation

It isn’t a secret that the Australian Breastfeeding Project wants to normalise milk sharing.
This is an image of a beautiful mumma (sitting down) who exclusively expresses, the two mummas standing have both donated milk. I had a vision of showing mums have each others back!

WHO code brestfeeding
The world health organisation has told us that donor milk should come before breast milk substitutes but this isn’t widely known. The project aims to change that and normalise milk sharing.

“GLOBAL STRATEGY FOR INFANT AND YOUNG CHILD FEEDING
10 Exercising other feeding options
18. The vast majority of mothers can and should breastfeed, just as the
vast majority of infants can and should be breastfed. Only under
exceptional circumstances can a mother’s milk be considered un-
suitable for her infant. For those few health situations where in-
fants cannot, or should not, be breastfed, the choice of the best
alternative – expressed breast milk from an infant’s own mother,
breast milk from a healthy wet-nurse or a human-milk bank, or a
breast-milk substitute fed with a cup, which is a safer method than
a feeding bottle and teat – depends on individual circumstances.
19. For infants who do not receive breast milk, feeding with a suitable
breast-milk substitute – for example an infant formula prepared in
accordance with applicable Codex Alimentarius standards, or a
home-prepared formula with micronutrient supplements – should
be demonstrated only by health workers, or other community work-
ers if necessary, and only to the mothers and other family members
who need to use it; and the information given should include ad-
equate instructions for appropriate preparation and the health haz-
ards of inappropriate preparation and use. Infants who are not
breastfed, for whatever reason, should receive special attention from
the health and social welfare system since they constitute a risk
group.” -WHO

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